Essential Things To Know About Burger Press To Make Hamburgers


I know “those things” as steak weights or burger press. I’m not a big fan of them as a kitchen tool. If you are cooking burgers on a flat top grill, they do a great job of helping to create a crispy and flavorful crust on the face of the burger, but they force the juices out of the patty. Any pro burger cooker knows that moisture and fat are two essential elements of a delicious burger, and sacrificing them for more browning is a compromise at best.

On a charbroiler steak weights are a big no-no for three reasons: 

1.They force the juices out of the burger, which causes dry meat, flare ups, and burnt edges. 

2.They will create too much char on the meat in contact with the broiler grates. It has an overpowering flavor, and

3. They smash the burgers, giving them an unpleasant appearance.

Broiler cooks love them because they believe that steak weights help the burgers to cook faster. And when you’ve got a grill full of wells and mid-wells, you want them to prepare quickly. Additionally, we’ve done a lot of testing. however, the racks only save you one to two minutes of cooking time in exchange for a lower quality product.

Essential Things To Know about Burger Press To Make Hamburgers
Essential Things To Know about Burger Press To Make Hamburgers

What Is Grill Press? Is It Similar To Burger Press?

It’s called a grill weight or a grill press. I don’t recommend that you use it for cooking a burger because it squeezes out the juices. The only reason that restaurants use them is to keep thin burgers from curling from the heat. I’ve cooked in restaurants, and we didn’t bother with them and used to yell at grill cooks who would smash a burger to get it to cook faster. It makes for mediocre burgers. Especially don’t use them on turkey burgers. They will be dry and fall apart.

Essential Things To Know about Burger Press To Make Hamburgers
Essential Things To Know about Burger Press To Make Hamburgers

How To Make Burgers At Home?

We make burgers frequently at home. Weigh out four or five ounces (114 to 140 g) of ground beef, gently shape it into a patty about an inch and a half (4 cm) thick. Sprinkle your patties with salt on both sides. Heat your pan or skillet until a drop of water dances. Spritz a little oil on the pan, grill, or barbecue and wipe it to an even coat with a wad of paper towels. Use tongs to hold the paper towels if it is too hot. Drop your burger on the surface and LEAVE IT ALONE for at least four minutes. Flip your burger with a spatula. Then, leave it alone for at least three minutes. Take its temperature with an instant-read thermometer. Rare is 125 F (52 C), Medium is around 130 F (55C), and Well Done is over 140 F (60 C). Keep flipping the burger every two minutes or so until you reach your desired internal temperature. REST the burger for at least five minutes to allow the heat to stop rising and for the juices to redistribute. Your burger, even Medium Well, should be juicy and tasty. If you have salted your burger and oiled your surface, you do not need a grill weight to hold it down. If you absolutely must use your new toy, set the load on the burger. Do not press down and squish it.

Grill weights work pretty well if you are cooking steak or bacon on a grill and work excellent for grilled cheese sandwiches.

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